contact us

Use the form on the right to contact us.

You can edit the text in this area, and change where the contact form on the right submits to, by entering edit mode using the modes on the bottom right.

6 Mayfred Avenue
Hope Valley, SA, 5090
Australia

The official website of adventurer and author of It Takes Two To Tandem, Louise George. Louise currently resides in Adelaide, South Australia with her husband. The two regularly travel and undertake many adventures together, including riding travelling 880 miles through the United Kingdom, from John O’Groats to Lands End.

MY BLOG

Nepal - Manaslu Circuit - Day 6 - Namrung to Lho

Louise George

DSC01306.JPG

With the enormous porridge bowl filled to a centre peak higher than the brim, it’s too much this morning. Nev is well today but I'm feeling a little queasy.  The apple slices looked appetizing but with the flavour of onion evident, I was easily deterred from eating breakfast.  I was reminded of the numerous times I had seen washing of stainless steel bowls, mugs and pressure cookers outdoors, probably in cold water and the less than hygienic lifestyle was sitting heavy in my belly this morning.

I had time before our departure to walk back through Namrung village. I was interested in checking out the ‘resort’.  We’ve taken 5 days to get to this point but the Nubri Four Seasons resort offers 4 day packages to tourists that includes a helicopter return flight from Kathmandu, meals, a few hours of walking on two of the days, foot massages and hot showers! I walk past a woman sitting outdoors in the meagre warmth, weaving yak hairinto a colourful scarf.  The light and temperature is probably far superior outdoors, to what she would have experienced in her stone house.

Our trek started around 7:30, mostly on a track that is more hard packed earth and only some stairs. We cautiously crossed five snowy avalanches. There were still some steep climbs that I felt I was struggling with, and I tried the nasal breathing that KK advised was the best for oxygen intake but breathing in and out of my nose just initiated snot forming, so I kept stopping to blow.  My body seemed to be overheating on the climbs so I put my poor performance down to not feeling too well. We made good time to Lho, arriving at 11:42, so a trek of only 4 hours 25 minutes with a morning tea break. The early arrival gave us time to wash our clothes, have a hot shower (200 rupee) including a hair wash.  The afternoon was sunny but a cold breeze cut to the bone. The room was like a wind tunnel.   Nev , Jo and Greg climbed up to a Buddhist monastery.  It was high on the hillside and I decided to stay back to rest. When we arrived there was a community meeting of locals underway.  There were many people sitting outside with a spectacular view over the valley and the mountains beyond.  Their discussions continued to around 5:30 by which time it was bitterly cold. There were lots of raised voices at one point, and everyone standing and yelling, and a bit of argy bargy. I can't believe how cold it is! I have fleece pants covering my legs and my body is layered with merino chamisole, tshirt and sweater, a down jacket and head topped with a hat. At least it has been sunny and warm while trekking. KK tells us there is bad news about the pass, because of recent snow.  Evidently Samarkand to Samdo is 2 feet deep with snow. Time will tell. Rained heavily in the night, woke 10:15 thinking it must be around 4am as disparate to go to toilet, had to go out in pelting rain. Fresh snow down quite low. Villages have little children greeting “Namaste chocolate”, “Namaste balloon” with palm outstretched we have nothing for them. Most have running noses and cheeks skin thick and red as in wind burn.

Our trek started around 7:30, mostly on a track that is more hard packed earth and only some stairs. We cautiously crossed five snowy avalanches. There were still some steep climbs that I felt I was struggling with, and I tried the nasal breathing that KK advised was the best for oxygen intake but breathing in and out of my nose just initiated snot forming, so I kept stopping to blow.  My body seemed to be overheating on the climbs so I put my poor performance down to not feeling too well. We made good time to Lho, arriving at 11:42, so a trek of only 4 hours 25 minutes with a morning tea break. The early arrival gave us time to wash our clothes, have a hot shower (200 rupee) including a hair wash.  The afternoon was sunny but a cold breeze cut to the bone. The room was like a wind tunnel. 

Nev , Jo and Greg climbed up to a Buddhist monastery.  It was high on the hillside and I decided to stay back to rest. When we arrived there was a community meeting of locals underway.  There were many people sitting outside with a spectacular view over the valley and the mountains beyond.  Their discussions continued to around 5:30 by which time it was bitterly cold. There were lots of raised voices at one point, and everyone standing and yelling, and a bit of argy bargy. I can't believe how cold it is! I have fleece pants covering my legs and my body is layered with merino chamisole, tshirt and sweater, a down jacket and head topped with a hat. At least it has been sunny and warm while trekking. KK tells us there is bad news about the pass, because of recent snow.  Evidently Samarkand to Samdo is 2 feet deep with snow. Time will tell. Rained heavily in the night, woke 10:15 thinking it must be around 4am as disparate to go to toilet, had to go out in pelting rain. Fresh snow down quite low. Villages have little children greeting “Namaste chocolate”, “Namaste balloon” with palm outstretched we have nothing for them. Most have running noses and cheeks skin thick and red as in wind burn.